Whakapapa

Gnarled rest-home fingers— like roots coiling into themselves —remember their parents.

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Outside of this sitcom

we are doing a scene things are going great no one has forgotten a line, and everyone’s timing is on point a familiar little girl is peering in through the glass door behind the kitchen table we can just make her out she is very pretty, and is shyly mimicking our movements it looks like… Continue reading Outside of this sitcom

What happens under covers

I am cold fingertips pressed against a soft, mochi thigh; an obnoxious, novelty alarm clock. You are legs kicking under duvet sheets when I yell not to move! We are the fart you let out when shocked awake: we are momentarily trapped – warm and familiar – and though we will soon dissipate and be… Continue reading What happens under covers

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though soon old, ripened fruits cling to limbs a breeze comes through to steal a kiss— this endless, looming summer

A short walk

A highway we all walk down: the old, the ugly, the young, and the beautiful. Travelling in the procession; navigating all the shit and the refuse; amidst all the booing and jeering; someone grabs our arm, tells us we are wonderful... and the pageant is glorious!

Forever swimming

The public pool we broke into each summer was filled in long ago. On days bright as this I still swim in it with you.

Sugar crash

He was the sweetest boy, but so self-absorbed! Nevertheless Daya couldn't deny that she had loved him and had hoped he'd loved her back. Now, after all this mollycoddling, he was finally ready to let her go. She could move on. He knew Daya was a prostitute, everyone did, because she made it no secret.… Continue reading Sugar crash

Happy memories

Under an old oak tree a husband slaps his wife’s ass. She turns her head over her shoulder, peering down at him from the slope they both lie on. “Did you like that?” he asks in a silly voice. She narrows her eyes, looking annoyed. He does it again. “How how about that? Did you… Continue reading Happy memories

희망 양 (Hope: Part one)

In a small-to-medium-sized city at the southern end of South Korea, in a small but well-appointed apartment, there lived a kind and generous woman, full of good intentions for her husband and two young children. The husband—a primary school teacher—was also very kind, and full of love towards his family. The children were especially well-behaved,… Continue reading 희망 양 (Hope: Part one)

How have you blossomed?

Like a new flower unfurling: a dream towards the light. Beyond all obstacles; irrational. Like dried petals beneath the sun: I can only love you.